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1901535_10152344558202307_4717780249241934311_nOct. 22, 2014 – “Dust, Drought, and Dreams Gone Dry,” a national traveling exhibition about the causes and aftermath of the historic Dust Bowl period, will be on display at the Edmon Low Library at Oklahoma State University from Oct. 22-Dec. 12, 2014. Oklahoma State University was one of only 25 sites nationwide selected to present the exhibit that was developed by the American Library Association Public Programs Office in coordination with the Oklahoma State University Library and the Mount Holyoke College Library.

The exhibition recalls a tragic period in United States history — the drought and dust storms that wreaked havoc on the Great Plains in the 1930s — and explores its environmental and cultural consequences. It raises several thought-provoking questions: What caused fertile farms to turn to dust? How did people survive? What lessons can we learn?

The Dust Bowl was one of the worst man-made ecological disasters in American history. This exhibition delves into the history and geography behind the Dust Bowl, and also provides a human element; through the words of the survivors themselves, we learn what it was like to live through such a difficult time.

“Dust, Drought, and Dreams Gone Dry” will be accompanied by a series of free library programs, including lectures and film screenings. The exhibition and programs feature several overlapping humanities themes: the nature of the connection between humans and nature; the many ways human beings respond to adversity; and how people came to understand and to describe their experiences living through the Dust Bowl. It was made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the Human Endeavor.

The exhibition is free and open to the public during library hours. Find more information here.